Thursday, April 26, 2012 Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Wikipedia & Libraries

libraryjournal:

Wikipedia
Via: Open-Site.org

What do you think of this infographic?

Thursday, January 12, 2012
newyorker:

Has James Joyce Been Set Free?

On New Year’s Eve, the Twitter feed of UbuWeb, an online archive of the avant garde, posted a link to an article in The Irish Times about the expiry of European copyright on the work of James Joyce. The link was accompanied by a curt message to Joyce’s grandson and sole living descendent: “Fuck you Stephen Joyce. EU copyright on James Joyce’s works ends at midnight.” While the language may have been unusually confrontational, the sentiment it expressed is widespread. The passage into public domain of Joyce’s major works has been talked up in certain quarters as though it were a bookish version of the destruction of the Death Star, with Stephen Joyce cast as a highbrow Darth Vader suddenly no longer in a position to breathe heavily down the necks of rebel Joyceans.

-Mark O’Connell on what the post-Stephen will bring: http://nyr.kr/xj2D9F

newyorker:

Has James Joyce Been Set Free?

On New Year’s Eve, the Twitter feed of UbuWeb, an online archive of the avant garde, posted a link to an article in The Irish Times about the expiry of European copyright on the work of James Joyce. The link was accompanied by a curt message to Joyce’s grandson and sole living descendent: “Fuck you Stephen Joyce. EU copyright on James Joyce’s works ends at midnight.” While the language may have been unusually confrontational, the sentiment it expressed is widespread. The passage into public domain of Joyce’s major works has been talked up in certain quarters as though it were a bookish version of the destruction of the Death Star, with Stephen Joyce cast as a highbrow Darth Vader suddenly no longer in a position to breathe heavily down the necks of rebel Joyceans.

-Mark O’Connell on what the post-Stephen will bring: http://nyr.kr/xj2D9F
Tuesday, January 10, 2012 Monday, November 21, 2011
nevver:

Expert
Wednesday, November 9, 2011

thelifeguardlibrarian:

appsandstacks:
Clive Thompson on Why Kids Can’t Search - Wired.com
High school and college students may be “digital natives,” but they’re  wretched at searching. In a recent experiment at Northwestern, when 102  undergraduates were asked to do some research online, none went to the  trouble of checking the authors’ credentials. In 1955, we wondered why  Johnny can’t read. Today the question is, why can’t Johnny search?
[…]
Consider the efforts of Frances Harris, librarian at the magnet  University Laboratory High School in Urbana, Illinois. (Librarians are  our national leaders in this fight; they’re the main ones trying to  teach search skills to kids today.) Harris educates eighth and ninth  graders in how to format nuanced queries using Boolean logic and  advanced settings. She steers them away from raw Google searches and has  them use academic and news databases, too.

In my experience, there is a MAJOR problem with the assumption that teenagers are ‘digital natives.’ Hardly any of the youth I work with are competent with a keyboard. They are uncertain how to navigate to websites, they continually ask Google questions rather than searching by keyword, and they have no visual literacy skills in recognizing legitimate websites. We assume too much about kids’ experience with computers rather than creating information/tech literacy curricula that supports our students through primary and secondary school.

thelifeguardlibrarian:

appsandstacks:

Clive Thompson on Why Kids Can’t Search - Wired.com

High school and college students may be “digital natives,” but they’re wretched at searching. In a recent experiment at Northwestern, when 102 undergraduates were asked to do some research online, none went to the trouble of checking the authors’ credentials. In 1955, we wondered why Johnny can’t read. Today the question is, why can’t Johnny search?

[…]

Consider the efforts of Frances Harris, librarian at the magnet University Laboratory High School in Urbana, Illinois. (Librarians are our national leaders in this fight; they’re the main ones trying to teach search skills to kids today.) Harris educates eighth and ninth graders in how to format nuanced queries using Boolean logic and advanced settings. She steers them away from raw Google searches and has them use academic and news databases, too.

In my experience, there is a MAJOR problem with the assumption that teenagers are ‘digital natives.’ Hardly any of the youth I work with are competent with a keyboard. They are uncertain how to navigate to websites, they continually ask Google questions rather than searching by keyword, and they have no visual literacy skills in recognizing legitimate websites. We assume too much about kids’ experience with computers rather than creating information/tech literacy curricula that supports our students through primary and secondary school.

Friday, November 4, 2011 Thursday, October 27, 2011