Thursday, September 27, 2012

Sandra Cisneros is a Mexican-American novelist, poet, and short story writer. Her books include The House on Mango Street, Caramelo, and Woman Hollering Creek. She is the recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as a Macarthur “Genius” Grant.

The first female Mexican-American writer to have her work published by a mainstream publisher, Cisneros has seen her books translated worldwide and The House on Mango Street remains required reading in middle schools, high schools, and universities across the country.

(Source: makers.com)

paperlanternlit:

Did you know it’s National Hispanic Heritage Month? Check out this great list of Latino and Latina YA and children’s writers!

!!!

paperlanternlit:

Did you know it’s National Hispanic Heritage Month? Check out this great list of Latino and Latina YA and children’s writers!

!!!

(Source: lauriehalseanderson)

Tuesday, September 25, 2012
paperlanternlit:

Did you know it’s National Hispanic Heritage Month? Check out this great list of Latino and Latina YA and children’s writers!

paperlanternlit:

Did you know it’s National Hispanic Heritage Month? Check out this great list of Latino and Latina YA and children’s writers!

(Source: lauriehalseanderson)

Tuesday, September 18, 2012
Friday, September 7, 2012
This was the first book I’d read in a long, long time that actually befit the name “page turner,” where the time flew by as the plot grew thicker and creepier, where the world it created inhabited my thoughts even when I wasn’t reading it. This book is exciting in so many different ways: aside from just being a thoroughly enjoyable and thrilling read, it’s one of the first sci-fi young adult novels I’ve ever read with such solid queer characters. The plot of this book is so engrossing that it won’t just be read by queer kids because it’s queer. Kids of all stripes will read this, and get an awesome queer perspective injected into their brains as a bonus. Jill Guccini’s wonderful review of Adaptation in her column “Your New School Library” at AfterEllen (via malindalo)
Wednesday, September 5, 2012

mcnallyjackson:

New paperbacks, grading the covers:

The Stranger’s Child: A

I was worried that, for The Stranger’s Child (Hollinghurst’s first foray into the fantasy genre), the book’s designers would make the common mistake of depicting the novel’s fantasy world on the cover, thereby depriving readers of the opportunity to imagine it for themselves.

But wisely, they avoided that strategy, and instead gave us an image of the novel’s characters on their way to the magical land’s gateway. Enticing, yet understated. Well done.

The Marriage Plot: C-

Yes, that font is perfect, and those watercolor drawings are lovely.

The only problem? As we all know The Marriage Plot is (to quote the jacket copy) “the action-packed thriller about hotheaded C.I.A. agent Mitchell Grammaticus and his attempt to kill international warlord Leonard Bankhead. His plan: hire the beautiful yet deadly assassin Madeleine Hanna to pose as a wealthy oil heiress, make Leonard fall in love with her, and then assassinate him on their wedding night. Will Madeleine be successful? Or will her own unexpected feelings keep her from carrying out The Marriage Plot?”

Exciting stuff, but you’d never know it by looking at this cover! It makes it look the book’s about a bunch of liberal arts kids and their post-college-graduation problems, or something like that.

oh snap, mcnally jackson.

Friday, August 31, 2012
millionsmillions:

Time for a little afternoon trivia: Hemingway or your mom’s email?

millionsmillions:

Time for a little afternoon trivia: Hemingway or your mom’s email?

Thursday, August 30, 2012
Putting pretty white girls on all your book covers is the book equivalent of what all our fashion magazines do. An idealization of beauty that is unrealistic and dangerous to our youth. And it isn’t the right thing to do. Seeing a minority grace the cover of a YA book is like spotting the Lochness monster, you wonder if you’ve truly seen it and if you’ll ever see it again. How sad is that? To say that only pretty white girls can sell YA books is not a business model that publishers should approve of. And it’s not true. We need look no further than the gender neutral and iconic covers for the Hunger Games and Twilight series to see the truth.

Ellen Oh  (via necesitamosunarevolucion)

Found the original essay, and added the sources in. Check it out; it is really a wonderful read (and was even cross posted to Racialicious).

The best book covers are the ones without people on them, and the art leaves it up to your imagination.

Tuesday, July 17, 2012
tobeshelved:

(via TO BE SHELVED: Mini cover critic)
A 6-year-old judges books by their covers. Clearly, this is adorable and hysterical. Click through for more on the blog. 

tobeshelved:

(via TO BE SHELVED: Mini cover critic)

A 6-year-old judges books by their covers. Clearly, this is adorable and hysterical. Click through for more on the blog.