Wednesday, May 2, 2012 Friday, January 13, 2012 Thursday, January 12, 2012
curiositycounts:

Jon Horvath uses GPS to replicate Jack Kerouac’s On The Road, exploring “the (dis)connection between Kerouac’s era and my present day as it pertains to spontaneous acts and the sensation of freedom.” More imaginative Kerouac visualizations.  (via)

curiositycounts:

Jon Horvath uses GPS to replicate Jack Kerouac’s On The Road, exploring “the (dis)connection between Kerouac’s era and my present day as it pertains to spontaneous acts and the sensation of freedom.” More imaginative Kerouac visualizations.  (via)

(Source: curiositycounts)

Tuesday, November 29, 2011
laughingsquid:

Cyber Bullying

I really do not think this is accurate and makes light of a prevalent and serious problem. Cyber bullying is a serious issue - not just for kids but for bloggers from all walks of life. There are some seriously scary groups of harassers out there, from kids who say “dick-ish things” to other kids (and then said victims committing suicide & bullies receive no punishment) to websites offering bounty for names, addresses, and information of women feminists (and acknowledge that the information could potentially be used for harm).
Guys, this IS AN ISSUE. Instead of poking fun at it, let’s think of ways we can help.

laughingsquid:

Cyber Bullying

I really do not think this is accurate and makes light of a prevalent and serious problem. Cyber bullying is a serious issue - not just for kids but for bloggers from all walks of life. There are some seriously scary groups of harassers out there, from kids who say “dick-ish things” to other kids (and then said victims committing suicide & bullies receive no punishment) to websites offering bounty for names, addresses, and information of women feminists (and acknowledge that the information could potentially be used for harm).

Guys, this IS AN ISSUE. Instead of poking fun at it, let’s think of ways we can help.

Tuesday, November 15, 2011 Monday, November 14, 2011 Wednesday, November 9, 2011

thelifeguardlibrarian:

appsandstacks:
Clive Thompson on Why Kids Can’t Search - Wired.com
High school and college students may be “digital natives,” but they’re  wretched at searching. In a recent experiment at Northwestern, when 102  undergraduates were asked to do some research online, none went to the  trouble of checking the authors’ credentials. In 1955, we wondered why  Johnny can’t read. Today the question is, why can’t Johnny search?
[…]
Consider the efforts of Frances Harris, librarian at the magnet  University Laboratory High School in Urbana, Illinois. (Librarians are  our national leaders in this fight; they’re the main ones trying to  teach search skills to kids today.) Harris educates eighth and ninth  graders in how to format nuanced queries using Boolean logic and  advanced settings. She steers them away from raw Google searches and has  them use academic and news databases, too.

In my experience, there is a MAJOR problem with the assumption that teenagers are ‘digital natives.’ Hardly any of the youth I work with are competent with a keyboard. They are uncertain how to navigate to websites, they continually ask Google questions rather than searching by keyword, and they have no visual literacy skills in recognizing legitimate websites. We assume too much about kids’ experience with computers rather than creating information/tech literacy curricula that supports our students through primary and secondary school.

thelifeguardlibrarian:

appsandstacks:

Clive Thompson on Why Kids Can’t Search - Wired.com

High school and college students may be “digital natives,” but they’re wretched at searching. In a recent experiment at Northwestern, when 102 undergraduates were asked to do some research online, none went to the trouble of checking the authors’ credentials. In 1955, we wondered why Johnny can’t read. Today the question is, why can’t Johnny search?

[…]

Consider the efforts of Frances Harris, librarian at the magnet University Laboratory High School in Urbana, Illinois. (Librarians are our national leaders in this fight; they’re the main ones trying to teach search skills to kids today.) Harris educates eighth and ninth graders in how to format nuanced queries using Boolean logic and advanced settings. She steers them away from raw Google searches and has them use academic and news databases, too.

In my experience, there is a MAJOR problem with the assumption that teenagers are ‘digital natives.’ Hardly any of the youth I work with are competent with a keyboard. They are uncertain how to navigate to websites, they continually ask Google questions rather than searching by keyword, and they have no visual literacy skills in recognizing legitimate websites. We assume too much about kids’ experience with computers rather than creating information/tech literacy curricula that supports our students through primary and secondary school.

theatlanticvideo:

Bullet-Stopping Books: Can Literature Literally Save Your Life?

Literary magazine Electric Literature embraces publishing in the digital age, making short fiction available on all available platforms. It’s fitting, then, that this promotional video for the magazine explores the Internet-friendly theme of shooting stuff with guns. Can any of the year’s fattest novels stop a bullet? What about that wild card, the Kindle?

Tuesday, November 8, 2011