Thursday, September 27, 2012
I struggled to find a better picture of Chris Claremont’s recent donation of his notes and personal archives of his work on X-Men. But this tiny offering from the Wall Street Journal is all that I could find, and there was nothing on Columbia’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library site. The article is worth a read:

Mr. Claremont’s 2011 donation is a game-changing addition to the university’s collection of graphic novels and related materials, which grew out of a pet project of librarian Karen Green.
“I think that our buying of comics and science fiction shows that we understand the value of things we used to see as perishable or less scholarly,” said Ms Green. It’s “not something we went after systematically before.” But now they are, she added.
The “X-Men” collection represents a core “around which we hope to build a collection of rich, comic-related material,” said Erik Wakin, Curator of Manuscripts at Columbia University during a symposium in March.

This collection has since grown to include more rare comics and manuscripts as well as a rare Science Fiction magazines.

I struggled to find a better picture of Chris Claremont’s recent donation of his notes and personal archives of his work on X-Men. But this tiny offering from the Wall Street Journal is all that I could find, and there was nothing on Columbia’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library site. The article is worth a read:

Mr. Claremont’s 2011 donation is a game-changing addition to the university’s collection of graphic novels and related materials, which grew out of a pet project of librarian Karen Green.

“I think that our buying of comics and science fiction shows that we understand the value of things we used to see as perishable or less scholarly,” said Ms Green. It’s “not something we went after systematically before.” But now they are, she added.

The “X-Men” collection represents a core “around which we hope to build a collection of rich, comic-related material,” said Erik Wakin, Curator of Manuscripts at Columbia University during a symposium in March.

This collection has since grown to include more rare comics and manuscripts as well as a rare Science Fiction magazines.

Friday, August 31, 2012
nevver:

Happy Birthday Robert Crumb

nevver:

Happy Birthday Robert Crumb

Tuesday, July 17, 2012
morerobots:

the ‘wrinkle in time’ square is so true. i feel like we’ve tessered through half of summer already. where did it go?

morerobots:

the ‘wrinkle in time’ square is so true. i feel like we’ve tessered through half of summer already. where did it go?

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

theparisreview:

Drunk texts from famous authors.

pretty sure I’ve done the Cheever one multiple times…

Monday, June 25, 2012
librarianrafia:

..and lasers! 

"I remember going to a party, evenly divided between writers and dancers from the New York City Ballet, back in those years, where once the people discovered what I did for a living, I was hooted at and called ‘Buck Rogers’ and ‘Flash Gordon’". - Ray Bradbury.
If only he had this comic to brandish at those people.

librarianrafia:

..and lasers! 

"I remember going to a party, evenly divided between writers and dancers from the New York City Ballet, back in those years, where once the people discovered what I did for a living, I was hooted at and called ‘Buck Rogers’ and ‘Flash Gordon’". - Ray Bradbury.

If only he had this comic to brandish at those people.

(Source: myjetpack)

Monday, April 2, 2012
radiomaru:

more info on the COLOR SCOTT PILGRIM INITIATIVE
*aka COLOUR SCOTT PILGRIM INITIATIVE

6” x 9” size (bigger)
hardcover
full color (colors by Nathan Fairbairn)
overseen and with newly ‘remastered’ art by myself
brand-new covers
brand-new ‘extras’ sections with sketchbook & development work, much of it previously unseen
first 3 volumes relettered with the font from the last 3 volumes
the ‘classic’ b&w editions will remain in print
color editions will come out 2 per year (1: august 2012, 2: october 2012, 3-4: 2013, 5-6: 2014)
what does ‘remastered art’ mean? in vol 1, not a lot… i adjusted things here and there to make the character designs a little more consistent. i did completely redraw a few panels (will you notice?). in vol 2, there’s a bit more redrawing but it’s almost all bg stuff… it’ll feel like you had bad vision, and suddenly you got new glasses.
will you like the color? i don’t know… tbh, you will always treasure the version you first encountered. for ‘old school fans’, that will be the b&w original book (NOT the movie, NOT the game, NOT the colorized books). the b&w books aren’t obsolete… they’re classic!!!!!!! they’re authentic!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
that said, the color is going to look really good, and feel free to be all judgy based on the sample pages, but as a whole unified project it’s going to look perfect i think. and the coloring will really evolve as the series goes on… the first volume is very similar to the movie, so i decided we should stick pretty close to the ‘look’ of the movie… as the story diverges, the colors will go their own way.
FINALLY, I HAVE TO SAY: This is the Oni Press edition (serving North America). Foreign editions (INCLUDING U.K.) may take longer or may not happen, it all depends on each individual region’s publisher. I apologize in advance if this process takes longer than we’d all like.
ADDITIONAL NOTE TO COSPLAYERS: i’m sorry for rocking your world

radiomaru:

more info on the COLOR SCOTT PILGRIM INITIATIVE

*aka COLOUR SCOTT PILGRIM INITIATIVE

  • 6” x 9” size (bigger)
  • hardcover
  • full color (colors by Nathan Fairbairn)
  • overseen and with newly ‘remastered’ art by myself
  • brand-new covers
  • brand-new ‘extras’ sections with sketchbook & development work, much of it previously unseen
  • first 3 volumes relettered with the font from the last 3 volumes
  • the ‘classic’ b&w editions will remain in print
  • color editions will come out 2 per year (1: august 2012, 2: october 2012, 3-4: 2013, 5-6: 2014)

what does ‘remastered art’ mean? in vol 1, not a lot… i adjusted things here and there to make the character designs a little more consistent. i did completely redraw a few panels (will you notice?). in vol 2, there’s a bit more redrawing but it’s almost all bg stuff… it’ll feel like you had bad vision, and suddenly you got new glasses.

will you like the color? i don’t know… tbh, you will always treasure the version you first encountered. for ‘old school fans’, that will be the b&w original book (NOT the movie, NOT the game, NOT the colorized books). the b&w books aren’t obsolete… they’re classic!!!!!!! they’re authentic!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

that said, the color is going to look really good, and feel free to be all judgy based on the sample pages, but as a whole unified project it’s going to look perfect i think. and the coloring will really evolve as the series goes on… the first volume is very similar to the movie, so i decided we should stick pretty close to the ‘look’ of the movie… as the story diverges, the colors will go their own way.

FINALLY, I HAVE TO SAY: This is the Oni Press edition (serving North America). Foreign editions (INCLUDING U.K.) may take longer or may not happen, it all depends on each individual region’s publisher. I apologize in advance if this process takes longer than we’d all like.

ADDITIONAL NOTE TO COSPLAYERS: i’m sorry for rocking your world

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Wonder Woman, the most recognizable female character in comics, became an iconic inspiration for countless women after her debut in All-Star Comics #8 in December 1941. As a worldwide ambassador of peace, she remains a figure of strength, beauty, and courage.

This positive image of a heroine readers could sympathize with and root for continued on in later years, gaining steam with the rise of feminism in the ’60s and ’70s.

USPS Stamp of Approval on Comic Book Heroines
Tuesday, March 20, 2012
Drawing comics is hard, it’s really really hard. This was the longest comic I had done to that point (4 issues, about 90 pages or so). I didn’t get done until towards the end of the year. I was slow. They even had to get someone else to ink the 3rd issue both because I sucked at inking and because I was way behind schedule. But all of it was a learning experience. At the same time, I had noooo money and was lettering Blue Monday comics for Oni and taking on side jobs from Udon - mostly more inking, which, again, I sucked at. It was a slow miserable year, I was poor, but hey I was young & skinny and enjoyed eating ramen. Bryan Lee O’Malley (creator/writer of Scott Pilgrim): Tips on how to become a comic artist
Tuesday, March 13, 2012

If you mean literally how did I sustain myself, it was a weird combination of taking good physical care of myself and drinking more than is perhaps strictly advisable. I don’t want to mythologize or glorify the difficulty of writing this book. Writing is just hard.

But this project was harder than the book about my father because I knew my mother would see it. And I knew there were other people waiting for it with certain expectations. No one was waiting for the book about my father, or expecting anything from it—I was completely free when I was writing Fun Home. But I had to write this second memoir with a huge boulder strapped to my back.

Alison Bechdel, from this excellent, excellent Q&A conducted by Heather McCormack. (via libraryjournal)
Wednesday, February 1, 2012