Thursday, October 20, 2011 Monday, October 17, 2011

Kate Beaton signing copies of her book Hark A Vagrant at Boston Book Fest, October 15, 2011.

Seth discusses his new work, The Great Northern Brotherhood of Canadian Cartoonists, at the Boston Book Fest on October 15, 2011.

Waiting their turn to speak alongside him on the stage are Alison Bechdel and Daniel Clowes.

Thursday, October 13, 2011 Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Drawn and Quarterly are giving away a copy of Daniel Clowes’ “The Death Ray” and Seth’s “The Great Northern Brotherhood of Canadian Cartoonists”! Check the link for details.

Thursday, September 29, 2011 Wednesday, September 14, 2011
The American Library Association  will be presenting and exhibiting at the New York Comic Con (NYCC),  October 13-16, 2011 in the Javits Center in Midtown Manhattan. NYCC is a convention  spanning the latest and greatest from the worlds of comics, movies, television,  manga, anime, and video games for fans and professionals alike. ALA will present  three programs for the library community and comics industry professionals during  the Professional Day, Thursday, October 13:  “Digital Comics & Libraries  - Past, Present & Future”, “Video Game Collection Development for  Libraries”  and “National Gaming Day @ your library: Using Video  Games and Comic Books as library outreach tools.” 
NYCC has generously extended free passes for all library  staff members on Professional Day, with Programming Hours from 12:00 PM to 4:00  PM and Show Floor hours of 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM open only to librarians, educators  and other industry members. Please visit New York Comic Con’s website and click on the Professional  Registration button. You’ll be able to register for a completely free badge for  Thursday. If you’d like to attend all weekend long, a badge for all four days is only $10. 
While you’re at the  show, please plan to stop by ALA’s Booth #2724 to say hello and to pick  up more information about integrating games, comics and graphic novels into your  collections and programming. We’ll also have information on how ALA Members  can get involved with ALA’s new Gaming Roundtable and the Graphic Novels  in Libraries Member Initiative Group.  
For your customers and patrons, New York Comic Con  hosts a “Kids Day” on Sunday, October 16, the final day of the show.  Children and tweens under 12 are welcomed to attend the Show and literary programs at no cost on Sunday. 
NYCC will support this in  your library with posters, bookmarks and pins. If you’d like to make Kids Day  available through your library please email Jul Sifers with New York Comic Con; they would  be happy to send you all the information and material to share this free event with your community.
We hope to see you in New  York at our Booth and during the Professional Day and throughout NYCC.  
Thanks, Tina ColemanStaff  Liaison, ALA Graphic Novels in Libraries MIG 
Get the word out and go!

The American Library Association will be presenting and exhibiting at the New York Comic Con (NYCC), October 13-16, 2011 in the Javits Center in Midtown Manhattan. NYCC is a convention spanning the latest and greatest from the worlds of comics, movies, television, manga, anime, and video games for fans and professionals alike. ALA will present three programs for the library community and comics industry professionals during the Professional Day, Thursday, October 13:  “Digital Comics & Libraries - Past, Present & Future”, “Video Game Collection Development for Libraries”  and “National Gaming Day @ your library: Using Video Games and Comic Books as library outreach tools.”

NYCC has generously extended free passes for all library staff members on Professional Day, with Programming Hours from 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM and Show Floor hours of 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM open only to librarians, educators and other industry members. Please visit New York Comic Con’s website and click on the Professional Registration button. You’ll be able to register for a completely free badge for Thursday. If you’d like to attend all weekend long, a badge for all four days is only $10.

While you’re at the show, please plan to stop by ALA’s Booth #2724 to say hello and to pick up more information about integrating games, comics and graphic novels into your collections and programming. We’ll also have information on how ALA Members can get involved with ALA’s new Gaming Roundtable and the Graphic Novels in Libraries Member Initiative Group. 

For your customers and patrons, New York Comic Con hosts a “Kids Day” on Sunday, October 16, the final day of the show. Children and tweens under 12 are welcomed to attend the Show and literary programs at no cost on Sunday.

NYCC will support this in your library with posters, bookmarks and pins. If you’d like to make Kids Day available through your library please email Jul Sifers with New York Comic Con; they would be happy to send you all the information and material to share this free event with your community.

We hope to see you in New York at our Booth and during the Professional Day and throughout NYCC. 

Thanks,
Tina Coleman
Staff Liaison, ALA Graphic Novels in Libraries MIG

Get the word out and go!

(Source: )

Thursday, September 8, 2011

"J. Michael Straczynski’s Wonder Woman puts a new spin on Diana’s origin in a way that amplifies her mythological roots while modernizing the backdrop against which her story is set… [He’s] succeeded in raising fan interest in Wonder Woman by providing a fresh, exciting new world for her to inhabit.”
- Dan Phillips, IGN

Just finished reading the Odyssey arc that Straczynski spearheaded and found it a very compelling read, a unique take on a truly fascinating character.  Wonder Woman can be an extremely tricky hero to get right, but Straczynski’s take manages to do just that.

"J. Michael Straczynski’s Wonder Woman puts a new spin on Diana’s origin in a way that amplifies her mythological roots while modernizing the backdrop against which her story is set… [He’s] succeeded in raising fan interest in Wonder Woman by providing a fresh, exciting new world for her to inhabit.”

- Dan Phillips, IGN

Just finished reading the Odyssey arc that Straczynski spearheaded and found it a very compelling read, a unique take on a truly fascinating character.  Wonder Woman can be an extremely tricky hero to get right, but Straczynski’s take manages to do just that.

The big break for me was I got tired of looking at stuff like The Dark Knight and Watchmen, which are wonderful and beautiful works, but for me the idea of taking our problems into the superhero world is ultimately a dead-end. When I was 25 or 26 it occurred to me that trying to make superheroes seem real was insane. They were not real in that way, but what really hit me was, “Well, in what way are they real?” They’re absolutely real in the form of paper, and so I wanted to go beyond that spurious realism of here’s what would happen if Batman got a run in his tights, or, “How does he go to the bathroom?” “Where does he keep his change?” Which I think are very dumb questions. In the book, one of the things I say is that people always believe kids don’t understand the difference between fact and fiction. But they do! A child can watch The Little Mermaid and they know the singing crabs on TV are very different from the real crabs on the beach. You give an adult a piece of fiction, and the adult cannot handle it. The adult begins to ask, “How can Batman afford to run a business and be Batman at night?” “How do the lasers come out of Superman’s eyes?” “Why does he wear those clothes?” And all you want to say is, “Because it’s not real!” It’s made up, and only in the made-up world can these things happen. I find that, in the last 10 years particularly, there’s this idea of grounding Superman, which just seems insane to me. And that’s what you always get from studio executives, is, “How do we ground this?”

Grant Morrison, from an interview he gave with fellow scribe Neil Gaiman in July.

Read the full interview with these truly captivating authors here.