Thursday, September 27, 2012
I struggled to find a better picture of Chris Claremont’s recent donation of his notes and personal archives of his work on X-Men. But this tiny offering from the Wall Street Journal is all that I could find, and there was nothing on Columbia’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library site. The article is worth a read:

Mr. Claremont’s 2011 donation is a game-changing addition to the university’s collection of graphic novels and related materials, which grew out of a pet project of librarian Karen Green.
“I think that our buying of comics and science fiction shows that we understand the value of things we used to see as perishable or less scholarly,” said Ms Green. It’s “not something we went after systematically before.” But now they are, she added.
The “X-Men” collection represents a core “around which we hope to build a collection of rich, comic-related material,” said Erik Wakin, Curator of Manuscripts at Columbia University during a symposium in March.

This collection has since grown to include more rare comics and manuscripts as well as a rare Science Fiction magazines.

I struggled to find a better picture of Chris Claremont’s recent donation of his notes and personal archives of his work on X-Men. But this tiny offering from the Wall Street Journal is all that I could find, and there was nothing on Columbia’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library site. The article is worth a read:

Mr. Claremont’s 2011 donation is a game-changing addition to the university’s collection of graphic novels and related materials, which grew out of a pet project of librarian Karen Green.

“I think that our buying of comics and science fiction shows that we understand the value of things we used to see as perishable or less scholarly,” said Ms Green. It’s “not something we went after systematically before.” But now they are, she added.

The “X-Men” collection represents a core “around which we hope to build a collection of rich, comic-related material,” said Erik Wakin, Curator of Manuscripts at Columbia University during a symposium in March.

This collection has since grown to include more rare comics and manuscripts as well as a rare Science Fiction magazines.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

historicity-was-already-taken:

You guys!! The Leo Baeck Institute has digitized a HUGE amount of materials including personal and legal documents, letters, artwork, family materials, unpublished autobiographies, business records and so forth. It has only gone live within the last week!

My adviser told me about this today when we were laying out the groundwork for my thesis research and I’ve been freaking out ever since (there have actually been two separate freakouts: one is history-student!me who’s all like OMGOMGOMGOMGOMG RESEARCH THIS IS AWESOME AND AMAZING AAAAAAH, and one is archives-student!me who’s all like OH MY GOD HOW DID THEY DIGITIZE ALL OF THIS OH MY GOD DIGITIZATION AAAAAH).

Anyway, here’s the link: DigiBaeck

There is nothing I love more than an excited archives student. Yay!

Wednesday, July 11, 2012
heyoscarwilde:

Last will and testament of the writer Jane Austen, written three months before her death. With the exception of a few small legacies, Jane left “everything” to her sister Cassandra.
via The National Archives UK

heyoscarwilde:

Last will and testament of the writer Jane Austen, written three months before her death. With the exception of a few small legacies, Jane left “everything” to her sister Cassandra.

via The National Archives UK

Thursday, June 28, 2012

awesomearchives:

James Joyce reading from Ulysses

via Public Domain Review

Always cool to hear an author read their own work.

Tuesday, June 19, 2012
usnatarchives:

Happy Birthday to the National Archives! The act creating the National Archives was signed on June 19, 1934, by President Roosevelt. The creation of a national archives for the United States had begun earlier, however. In 1926 Congress appropriated $6.9 million (later increased to $8.5 million) for a national archives building.  The building was designed as a “temple of history” by John Russell Pope, the architect who designed the National Gallery of Art and the Thomas Jefferson Memorial. The original plan for the National Archives Building had a courtyard into the center of the building. (It was quickly filled in to provide more storage space.) Ground was broken for the National Archives on September 9, 1931, and President Herbert Hoover laid the cornerstone of the building in February of 1933.  Construction was a huge task: installation of specialized air-handling systems and filters, reinforced flooring, and thousands of feet of shelving were needed to meet the building’s archival storage requirements. The exterior took more than 4 years to finish. But the number of records kept growing, and in 1993 a second National Archives building in College Park, MD, added 1.8 million square feet for storage of records. 
The National Archives now also includes 13 Presidential libraries and many regional archives and temporary records centers across the country. You can read more about our history and our holdings here: http://go.usa.gov/vBW

usnatarchives:

Happy Birthday to the National Archives! The act creating the National Archives was signed on June 19, 1934, by President Roosevelt. The creation of a national archives for the United States had begun earlier, however. In 1926 Congress appropriated $6.9 million (later increased to $8.5 million) for a national archives building.

The building was designed as a “temple of history” by John Russell Pope, the architect who designed the National Gallery of Art and the Thomas Jefferson Memorial. The original plan for the National Archives Building had a courtyard into the center of the building. (It was quickly filled in to provide more storage space.) Ground was broken for the National Archives on September 9, 1931, and President Herbert Hoover laid the cornerstone of the building in February of 1933.

Construction was a huge task: installation of specialized air-handling systems and filters, reinforced flooring, and thousands of feet of shelving were needed to meet the building’s archival storage requirements. The exterior took more than 4 years to finish. But the number of records kept growing, and in 1993 a second National Archives building in College Park, MD, added 1.8 million square feet for storage of records.

The National Archives now also includes 13 Presidential libraries and many regional archives and temporary records centers across the country. You can read more about our history and our holdings here: http://go.usa.gov/vBW


timetravelanddonuts:

From Life magazine: Photo from the 1971 ALA annual conference in Dallas. Barbara Gittings organized a booth offering free same-sex hugs and kisses.
The American Library Association’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table was the nation’s first GLBT professional organization. I’m proud to be part of such a forward-thinking field as librarianship.
(For those that are interested, the booth received a (predictably) mostly negative reaction, with little to no people stopping by for a free hug. So the staffers of the booth hugged and kissed each other. Gittings kissed Patience and Sarah author Alma Routsong (aka Isabel Miller) while cameras were rolling and made the nightly news. That same year she appeared with a panel of lesbians on the David Susskind Show to debunk gay stereotypes of the time. She was approached in a supermarket a week after the appearance by a middle-aged couple who claimed “You made me realize that you gay people love each other just the way Arnold and I do.”)

timetravelanddonuts:

From Life magazine: Photo from the 1971 ALA annual conference in Dallas. Barbara Gittings organized a booth offering free same-sex hugs and kisses.

The American Library Association’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table was the nation’s first GLBT professional organization. I’m proud to be part of such a forward-thinking field as librarianship.

(For those that are interested, the booth received a (predictably) mostly negative reaction, with little to no people stopping by for a free hug. So the staffers of the booth hugged and kissed each other. Gittings kissed Patience and Sarah author Alma Routsong (aka Isabel Miller) while cameras were rolling and made the nightly news. That same year she appeared with a panel of lesbians on the David Susskind Show to debunk gay stereotypes of the time. She was approached in a supermarket a week after the appearance by a middle-aged couple who claimed “You made me realize that you gay people love each other just the way Arnold and I do.”)

Thursday, May 24, 2012 Saturday, April 21, 2012
infoneer-pulse:

Archives digitize 19th century materials for 21st century access

The Victorian era has become ridiculously popular in the new millennium. Between costume drama in film and steampunk in print and video games, the dawn of the the modern technological age has captured the popular imagination. It has captured the scientific imagination as well, however, as two recent events indicate.
Gale/Cenage, publisher of research resources for libraries, schools and businesses, has announced the launch of Nineteenth Century Collections Online, a multiyear global digitization program.
At the same time, the British government has opened the “Migrated Archive” to the public. This collection of 8,800 records from Britain’s colonial history was considered too sensitive to leave behind as Britain gave up its empire. It is hosted at the National Archives.

» via ars technica

infoneer-pulse:

Archives digitize 19th century materials for 21st century access

The Victorian era has become ridiculously popular in the new millennium. Between costume drama in film and steampunk in print and video games, the dawn of the the modern technological age has captured the popular imagination. It has captured the scientific imagination as well, however, as two recent events indicate.

Gale/Cenage, publisher of research resources for libraries, schools and businesses, has announced the launch of Nineteenth Century Collections Online, a multiyear global digitization program.

At the same time, the British government has opened the “Migrated Archive” to the public. This collection of 8,800 records from Britain’s colonial history was considered too sensitive to leave behind as Britain gave up its empire. It is hosted at the National Archives.

» via ars technica

Sunday, April 15, 2012

Anyone know any good online, open access (free) articles on Alice Paul (or First Wave Feminism in general)

feministhistorian:

katiebell42:

Or on suffragists… or the Equal Right’s Amendment?

I’m looking for anything about these, including critical examinations on the problematic aspects of the movement.

I’m trying to create a digital library and am looking for a few things to include. The digital library will focus on Alice Paul at first, with the possibility of of later expanding to other First Wave feminists… if things go well, that is, and I get funding for the project (which is a long-shot).

There is no good online article for Alice Paul or women’s suffrage in general. The Library of Congress has some great photos of the National Woman’s Party, including Alice Paul, and Sewall Belmont has a lot of photos, cartoons, etc. from the NWP. The Alice Paul Institute has a good bio of Alice. You can find Alice Pauls oral history from 1972-1976 here and her interview with American heritage here. You can find a digital copy of Doris Stevens book Jailed for Freedom: American Women Win the Vote here.

As for finding things that are critical of the movement, you will probably be able to find blog post but nothing else. There really is not that much on Alice Paul and suffrage in general.

I wish you luck on the project.

actually, signal boosting this post because it has additional information.

librarian/archivist followers?