Wednesday, February 27, 2013
libraryjournal:

Come on folks! We are too good to stand for this. Tumblarians are legion.
Vote for our Conversation Starter and come talk with Tumblr superstar Rachel Fershleiser, Darien Library’s Erin “Laser Fingers” Shea, Lifeguard Librarian Kate Tkacik, and your humble Library Journal tumblrer at ALA Annual in Chicago!
Anyone can register to vote through ALA Connect, so take a sec to sign in and vote us up!

libraryjournal:

Come on folks! We are too good to stand for this. Tumblarians are legion.

Vote for our Conversation Starter and come talk with Tumblr superstar Rachel FershleiserDarien Library’s Erin “Laser Fingers” SheaLifeguard Librarian Kate Tkacik, and your humble Library Journal tumblrer at ALA Annual in Chicago!

Anyone can register to vote through ALA Connect, so take a sec to sign in and vote us up!

Monday, June 25, 2012
thelifeguardlibrarian:

Make this happen.

follow Kate. The best #ALA12 updates.

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Make this happen.

follow Kate. The best #ALA12 updates.

Tuesday, June 19, 2012
timetravelanddonuts:

From Life magazine: Photo from the 1971 ALA annual conference in Dallas. Barbara Gittings organized a booth offering free same-sex hugs and kisses.
The American Library Association’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table was the nation’s first GLBT professional organization. I’m proud to be part of such a forward-thinking field as librarianship.
(For those that are interested, the booth received a (predictably) mostly negative reaction, with little to no people stopping by for a free hug. So the staffers of the booth hugged and kissed each other. Gittings kissed Patience and Sarah author Alma Routsong (aka Isabel Miller) while cameras were rolling and made the nightly news. That same year she appeared with a panel of lesbians on the David Susskind Show to debunk gay stereotypes of the time. She was approached in a supermarket a week after the appearance by a middle-aged couple who claimed “You made me realize that you gay people love each other just the way Arnold and I do.”)

timetravelanddonuts:

From Life magazine: Photo from the 1971 ALA annual conference in Dallas. Barbara Gittings organized a booth offering free same-sex hugs and kisses.

The American Library Association’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table was the nation’s first GLBT professional organization. I’m proud to be part of such a forward-thinking field as librarianship.

(For those that are interested, the booth received a (predictably) mostly negative reaction, with little to no people stopping by for a free hug. So the staffers of the booth hugged and kissed each other. Gittings kissed Patience and Sarah author Alma Routsong (aka Isabel Miller) while cameras were rolling and made the nightly news. That same year she appeared with a panel of lesbians on the David Susskind Show to debunk gay stereotypes of the time. She was approached in a supermarket a week after the appearance by a middle-aged couple who claimed “You made me realize that you gay people love each other just the way Arnold and I do.”)

Monday, January 30, 2012
Fact: most American communities do not have the luxury of an indie bookstore and a library. More public libraries (9,225 according to ALA) exist than do independents in this country, so Random has done a wise thing by stepping up its library marketing and going deeper into the trenches to interact with patrons, likely part of the demographic who made “personal recommendations” (at 49.2 percent) the top ranking way that respondents in the Verso study found out about new books. Coming in at number two, not surprisingly, was bookstore staff recommendations (at 30.8 percent). Heather McCormack—Editor, LJ Book Review—takes on libraries’ role in helping connect readers (and consumers) to books in “A Most Optimistic Unconference: Publishers, Libraries, and Independent Bookstores at Digital Book World 2012.” (via libraryjournal)
Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Boys and Reading: Is There Any Hope?

5feet12inches:

By ROBERT LIPSYTE, Published: August 19, 2011

 At an American Library Association conference in 2007, HarperCollins dressed five of its male young adult authors in blue baseball jerseys with our names on the back and sent us up to bat in a panel entitled “In the Clubhouse.” We were meant to demystify to the overwhelmingly female audience the testosterone code that would get teenage boys reading. Whereas boys used to lag behind girls in reading in the early grades, statistics show, they soon caught up. Not anymore.

We guys had mixed feelings about the game plan: boys’ aversion to reading, let alone to novels, has been worsening for years. But while this certainly posed a problem for us male writers, we felt that we were being treated as a sideshow.

Read More

Tuesday, November 22, 2011
If Penguin has an issue with Amazon, we ask that they deal with Amazon directly and not hold libraries hostage to a conflict of business models. This situation is one more log thrown onto the fire of libraries’ abilities to provide access to books – in this case titles they’ve already purchased. Penguin should restore access for library patrons now. Maureen Sullivan, president-elect of ALA, Librarians Face Patrons Unhappy With Penguin Policy Change
Thursday, November 17, 2011

The dissolution of a library is unacceptable. Libraries serve as the cornerstone of our democracy and must be safeguarded. An informed public constitutes the very foundation of a democracy, and libraries ensure that everyone has free access to information.

The very existence of the People’s Library demonstrates that libraries are an organic part of all communities. Libraries serve the needs of community members and preserve the record of community history. In the case of the People’s Library, this included irreplaceable records and material related to the occupation movement and the temporary community that it represented.

We support the librarians and volunteers of the Library Working Group as they re-establish the People’s Library.”

A statement from American Library Association (ALA) President Molly Raphael regarding the destruction of the People’s Library. (via libraryjournal)
Monday, October 17, 2011 Thursday, September 29, 2011
But I know courage when I see it. I see it before me. Librarians are on the front lines. Blythe Woolston (via genrefluent)